PM Aroha

I made a thing: Aroha generator

So I made another thing. The only reason I’m really even talking about it is because what’s going on in Christchurch is so awful I can hardly bear it. Making new things (even simple things like this) is a good distraction.

So in an effort to cheer myself up I made a web thing that says Aroha (and basically anything else I choose) as many times as I ask it to. I did this in node.js, which I’ve never used before, so this is a good learning experience. I have no idea how to deploy anything in node yet, but once I learn I’ll put it up somewhere.

Obviously this is not something I expect to be used in anyway, but learning new things always puts my mind in a good place. It makes me think about the good things in life like change, growth and the new. Something we all need to be thinking more about, especially in dark times. I’m certainly not a perfect person, but I try hard to be a better one every day. We owe that to ourselves, we owe it to each other.

Aroha Generator in all its glory!

If you’re interested in this very random project, check it out on GitHub. If you feel like escaping for a bit then you’re welcome to add to it, or create your own, or help someone else to create one. Just remember to be kind to one another.

Aroha.

laptop todo

I made a thing: To-do list

Yep, I made another thing in JavaScript for the course I’m doing. This one’s a bit more basic, but really it’s more of cutting my teeth with jQuery sort of project rather than something anyone would actually use. It’s a very simple todo list app that lets you add and remove items from a simple list. It has no backend so you can’t save your list or anything useful like that, but the front end side of things does the job at this stage.

A simple to-do list app

If you’re interested in the code you can take a look on GitHub. Of course, you can try the app for yourself. If you find anything wrong with it you can submit an issue.

Hex

Hex

Just a quick post to say I’ve updated the colour game with a new mode, Hex colours. To enable different modes I’ve changed a little bit of the UI. So the difficulty is now a dropdown making room for a matching mode dropdown. The beauty of this is I can add other modes (CMYK for example) without to much UI fuss.

Screen shot of the new UI

To give this new model a try, just select Hex from that dropdown and the board will refresh. As always you can play the game and/or check out the code, which ever tickels your fancy.

RGB colour game updated UI

RGB Colour Game UI update

Tonight I got a bit of time to work on a new version of RGB colour game. This time I focused mostly on UI improvements so the game looks a little nicer than the first release. I’m particularly fond of the subtle CSS transition when you click on an incorrect colour. Little touches like this are what make a UI a bit loveable.

I’ve updated the code on both the GitHub repo and the live app site, so take a look. As always, if you have a feature request, a bug to report, or you’d like to contribute some code, you’re always welcome.

Colour Game Screenshot

I made a thing – Colour Game

I made another thing in JavaScript as part of the course I’m doing. This time it’s a simple colour picker game. The code is still very rough but the app is effectivly working. If you want to see it in action you can play the current version.

The idea of the game is the player is presented with up to six coloured squares and an RGB value. They player then has to pick the square that matches the RGB value. There’s an easy (3 colours) and hard (6 colours) mode too, so you can vary the challenge of the game.

If you’re interested in the code (which is currently terrible) or you’d like to report a bug, take a look at the projects GitHub page.

2 out of 3 aint bad

I made a thing – Score keeper

I’ve been doing a web development course for a few months and today I made my first thing that actually does something. Nothing amazing mind you, but it’s a start.

Do you ever have the need to keep score in a best 2 out of 3 kind of way? Me neither, but here’s a web app that does it regardless  🙂

At some stage, I’ll pop it on a web server and make it live for anyone to use. For now, if you’re interested in the code, take a look at the GitHub repo or you can download it directly.

Update: The app’s now live. Give it a try.

Keynote countdown timer ⏲

I made a thing!

I was helping a friend with a Keynote presentation deck. One of the tricker parts was that it needed an automatic 30 min on-screen timer to tick down. I’m something of a Keynote wizard, but I hadn’t made a timer before, but I happened upon this great tutorial on how to create one. Timers can be useful for all sorts of presentation types, particularly in classrooms and workshop situations. As easy as the process is to create one, it is quite time-consuming. So rather than do it once and be done with it, I thought I may as well share it.

To that end, here’s my Keynote countdown GitHub repo or you can download it direct. Enjoy.

Museum exhibit

Done: Night at the museum ☑️

I’ve been AFK for a while (holiday) so I just wanted to post the details of the final version of “night at the museum” I finished a few weeks ago that I delivered as part of my Udacity VR course.

The project went well (in that I passed) but I have to admit it was an exercise in restraint as much as anything. Like a lot of people, I tend to have big plans for everything I make but those plans are not always practical. This project was no exception. While I am ultimately happy with what I created, I do consider it very much a minimum viable project. When it comes to working on assignments like this there are a number of things to consider. First and foremost for me is available time.

I’m totally loving learning VR development, at this point, I spend almost all my free time doing it. But working full time and having a young family is a busy time in life, so if I want to progress projects I have to be efficient with my time or things can stagnate. Also, I currently pay for my studies via a monthly subscription so every extra month a project slips into comes at a significant extra cost.

Just to give you a few examples of compromises made on this project:

  1. Playing content at each of the stations was fairly limited and doesn’t have much finesse. For example, the final build allows the user to play audio from all 5 stations at the same time, this leads to a fairly horrible experience if a user does this
  2. I reused a museum model from a previous project because it was faster than building my own. This means it’s not really an ideal setup. Space feels a little constrained and doesn’t provide much room to move about. Most real museums are quite spacious so it didn’t really fit the aesthetic I was aiming for
  3. I wasn’t that happy with the spatial audio implementation. The environment had a bit too much reverberated for my liking and given more time I would have improved this a bit
  4. There’s no environmental audio, just the content of the stations. I’d preferred to add some atmosphere to the scene just to add the feel of the place

There are loads of other things that could be better about the final deliverable, but ultimately what was made “did the job”. Creating anything is always a series of compromises and I think delivering something you can live with and (resourcing permitting) can be built upon, is more important than getting things perfect. Perfection, after all, is the enemy of the shipped.

If you’re interested in the project’s code, it’s all available on my Github account. Enjoy.